89.9 WDAV Classical Public Radio Smaller Fonts Larger Fonts
Home Listen Playlist Programs Community & Events Individual Support Business Support About Contact
 
Classical 89.9 WDAV
Reel Music 2010
Overview | Reel Music Hosts

Reel MusicReel Music explores the original music written in the European classical model that accompanies and enhances the dramatic elements of a film.The music on the program spans the earliest days of silent film (known as “early film” because the movies were never actually silent – they always had musical accompaniment), to the leading composers working in the medium today, including Thomas Newman, James Horner, Danny Elfman and Howard Shore.  Frank Dominguez hosts and Davidson College professor Neil Lerner provides commentary.

Get suggestions for film books and recordings at the Reel Music Fun Stuff page.

Saturdays at  2 p.m.
Program Schedule
March 27, 2010
The Master of Suspense, Alfred Hitchcock

Alfred HitchcockSample excerpts from the Hitchcock scores to some of his most memorable films, including Rebecca, Vertigo and North by Northwest.  You’ll also hear commentary about Hitchcock’s unique use of music in film from Davidson College film music scholar Neil Lerner.

Franz Waxman – Rebecca
National Philharmonic Orchestra
Charles Gerhardt, conductor

Arthur Benjamin – “The Storm Clouds”
Cantata from The Man Who Knew Too Much
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
Elmer Bernstein, conductor
Ambrosian Singers
Claire Henry, soprano

Hugo Friedhofer – Lifeboat
The City of Prague Philharmonic
Paul Bateman, conductor

Miklós Rózsa – Concerto for Orchestra from Spellbound
The City of Prague Philharmonic
Paul Bateman, conductor

Bernard Herrmann – Prelude & Love Theme from Vertigo
Hollywood Bowl Orchestra
John Mauceri, conductor

Bernard Herrmann – Conversation Piece from North by Northwest
The City of Prague Philharmonic
Paul Bateman, conductor

Bernard Herrmann – The Hunt from Marnie
Los Angeles Philharmonic
Esa-Pekka Salonen

Bernard Herrmann – Excerpt from Psycho
London Philharmonic Orchestra
Bernard Herrmann, conductor

March 20, 2010
Stanley Kubrick
>>More Information
Stanley KubrickThis week on Reel Music the subject is master filmmaker Stanley Kubrick.  Hear excerpts from the scores to some of the visionary director’s best known films, such as Spartacus, 2001: A Space Odyssey and A Clockwork Orange.  There will also be excerpts from the scores of some of his early successes, such as Paths of Glory and The Killing.  Davidson College's film music scholar Neil Lerner talk about the ironic way in which Kubrick used music from pop culture to comment on the action in films such as Dr. Strangelove and Full Metal Jacket.
March 13, 2010
Oscar-Winning Movie Scores

Henry ManciniThis week's focus is on Oscar-winning movie scores. We listen to scores that have taken home the prize. Among the highlights will be music by film legends such as Erich Wolfgang Korngold and Maurice Jarre, scores by popular songwriters such as Henry Mancini and Burt Bacharach, and themes from recent Oscar winners such as Titanic and The Lord of the Rings trilogy.
March 6, 2010
2010 Oscar Preview
>>More Information

Oscar Statue


This week on Reel Music, scores that have been nominated for this year's Academy Award, with selections from Hans Zimmer, Michael Giacchino, James Horner, Marco Beltrami and Alexandre Desplat.  The 82nd Academy Awards are presented tomorrow night in Hollywood.
February 20, 2010
Max Steiner: The Man who Invented Movie Music
>>More Information

Max SteinerLearn more about “The Man who Invented Movie Music,” Max Steiner. Steiner is one of the influential European émigré composers who gave classic Hollywood its sound. Steiner took the art of film music to new heights with his landmark score for King Kong. Classic after classic followed in a career that spanned decades, with memorable movie music to accompany such films as Gone With The Wind, Now Voyager and The Searchers …

February 13, 2010
Romance at the Movies
>>More Information


Max SteinerWe’re head over heels in love with Romance at the Movies this Valentine’s Weekend. You’ll hear some immortal love themes from classic movie scores, including Lara’s Theme from Dr. Zhivago, music from Zeffirelli’s version of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, and the hit theme from the classic tear jerker Love Story. Composers represented include legends such as Max Steiner, Maurice Jarre and Michel Legrand, as well as contemporary film composers such as Michael Nyman.

February 6, 2010
Miklós Rózsa
>>More Information

Miklos RozsaThis week we sample the music of Miklós Rózsa, whose scores included flim noir, like Double Indemnity, and religious epics, like Ben Hur and King of Kings. Born in Hungary, Rózsa later moved to Los Angeles to complete his forty year career creating flim music. While many of Rózsa's works have a big and direct feel, he was also capable of creating works for more delicate scenes.  
January 30, 2010
Thomas Newman
>>More Information

Thomas NewmanThe focus is on a contemporary film composer who comes from a long line of movie music legends. Thomas Newman is the son of Alfred Newman, creator of the familiar 20th Century Fox fanfare and the head of music for the studios in Hollywood’s Golden Age. Son Thomas Newman is now one of the industry’s most respected composers, known for his incorporation of unusual instruments, sounds and effects into his hypnotic scores for films such as American Beauty, The Road to Perdition, and the TV series Six Feet Under.  
January 23, 2010
>>More Information

John WilliamsThis week we hear an appreciation of the music in the films of history’s most successful moviemaker, Steven Spielberg. Because Spielberg has collaborated almost exclusively with one composer throughout his career, an appreciation of the music in his films is by default a celebration of the versatility of composer John Williams. Hear excerpts from his scores for movies as diverse as E.T., Schindler’s List, and Minority Report.
January 16, 2010
John Barry
>>More Information

John BarryThis week focuses on one of the most distinctive voices in film music, English composer John Barry. Best known for his jazz and pop flavored scores for the classic James Bond films, Barry’s output stretches far beyond the spy thriller genre. He has written unforgettable music for everything from art house classics such as Walkabout to costume dramas such as The Lion in Winter and blockbuster Hollywood romances such as Out of Africa. He’s also a master of the seamlessly integrated pop tune in a movie score, having penned hit songs for several of the Bond films, as well as Born Free and Midnight Cowboy.
January 9, 2010
Nino Rota & Ennio Morricone
>>More Information
Nino RotaThis edition of Reel Music focuses on two Italian film score legends. Nino Rota has a reputation that transcends film to the worlds of ballet, opera and the concert hall, but he’s best known for memorable music for art house classics by Federico Fellini such as La Strada and 8½, and American masterpieces such as The Godfather. Ennio Morricone is also closely associated with a distinctive Italian movie director, Sergio Leone, the creator of Spaghetti Westerns starring Clint Eastwood, but he also wrote many other familiar scores for films such as Cinema Paradiso and The Mission.
January 2, 2010
From the Concert Hall to the Silver Screen
>>More Information
Listen for music from well-known 20th century classical composers who also wrote very successful film music, and the occasional forays into the concert world by composers better known for their movie scores.  Included will be Prokofiev’s music for the Soviet film Lt. Kije and the Eisenstein classic Alexander Nevsky, Aaron Copland’s music for the film version of John Steninberck’s The Red Pony, and John Corigliano’s Oscar-winning music for The Red Violin.  You’ll also hear concert works by film music legends such as Erich Wolfgang Korngold, John Williams and “legend in the making” Danny Elfman.
December 12, 2009
>>More Information
This week it’s Christmas Goes to the Movies! You’ll hear excerpts from the scores of some classic holiday films, such as It’s a Wonderful Life and Miracle on 34th Street, plus classic Christmas standards from the original scores of movie musicals such as Holiday Inn and Meet Me in St. Louis. And movie music scholar Neil Lerner offers an unusual pick for a great holiday film score, from Tim Burton’s Edward Scissorhands.
November 28, 2009
Patriotic Films

Franz Waxman – Suite from Sunrise at Campobello
National Philharmonic Orchestra, Fred Steiner, conductor
“America at the Movies”

Elmer Bernstein – Theme from The Magnificent Seven
Hollywood Bowl Symphony, Elmer Bernstein, conductor
“NPR Milestones of the Millennium: Music in Film”

John Williams – Hymn to the Fallen from Saving Private Ryan
Boston Symphony Orchestra, John Williams, conductor
“Saving Private Ryan: Music from the Original Motion Picture Sountrack”

John Williams – Born on the Fourth of July
“Born on the Fourth of July: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack Album

John Williams – Reprise, from The Patriot
“The Patriot: Original Motion Picture Score”

Aaron Copland – Morning on the Ranch, from The Red Pony
New Philharmonia Orchestra, Aaron Copland
“NPR Milestones of the Millennium: Music in Film”

James Horner – End Titles from Apollo 13
“Music from the Motion Picture Apollo 13”


Alan Silvestri – Contact – End Credits, from Contact
“Music from the Contact Motion Picture”

November 21, 2009
David Lean
>>More Information
David LeanListen to music from the films of the noted British director, David Lean. From light comedies to romances to epic adventures, Lean was a master filmmaker, and his movies had some memorable music to go with them. Over the course of a nearly fifty year career he collaborated with a number of exceptional composers, from musical nobles such as Sir Malcolm Arnold to film music legends such as Maurice Jarre. You’ll hear musical excerpts from his hit films such as Brief Encounter, The Bridge Over the River Kwai and Lawrence of Arabia.
November 14, 2009
From the Concert Hall to the Silver Screen

Listen for music from well-known 20th century classical composers who also wrote very successful film music, and the occasional forays into the concert world by composers better known for their movie scores.  Included will be Prokofiev’s music for the Soviet film Lt. Kije and the Eisenstein classic Alexander Nevsky, Aaron Copland’s music for the film version of John Steninberck’s The Red Pony, and John Corigliano’s Oscar-winning music for The Red Violin.  You’ll also hear concert works by film music legends such as Erich Wolfgang Korngold, John Williams and “legend in the making” Danny Elfman.


Sergei Prokofiev – Kije’s Wedding & Troika, from Lt. Kije
St. Petersburg Philharmonic/ Yuri Temirkanov
“Tchaikovksy: Nutcracker Suite, etc.”

Sergei Prokofiev – “Arise, Ye Russian People,” from Alexander Nevsky
Russian State Symphony Orchestra/Staninslavsky Chorus/Dmitry Yablonsky
“Prokofiev: Alexander Nevsky”

Shostakovich – Ball at the Castle, from Hamlet
Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra/Leonid Grin
“Dmitri Shostakovich: Hamlet/The Gadfly”

Aaron Copland – Morning on the Ranch and Walk to the Bunkhouse, from The Red Pony
Boston Pops Orchestra/John Williams
“Copland-Williams: Music for Stage and Screen”

John Corigliano – Theme and The Monastery, from The Red Violin
Joshua Bell, violin/Philharmonia Orchestra/Esa-Pekka Salonen
“The Red Violin Original Motion Picture Soundtrack”

Philip Glass – Morning Passages, from The Hours
Michael Riesman, piano/Orchestra conducted by Nick Ingman
“The Hours: Music from the Motion Picture”

Erich Wolfgang Korngold – Finale, from Symphony in F#, Op. 40
Philadelphia Orchestra/Franz Welser-Möst
“Korngold: Symphony in F#, etc.”

Miklós Rózsa – Finale, from Violin Concerto, Op. 24
Jascha Heifetz, violin/Dallas Symphony Orchestra/Walter Hendl
“Korngold/Rózsa/Waxman/Heifetz”

John Williams – Elegy for Cello and Orchestra
Yo-Yo Ma, cello/Recording Arts Orchestra of Los Angeles/John Williams
“Yo-Yo Ma Plays the Music of John Williams”

Danny Elfman – The Quadruped Patrol, from Serenada Schizophrana
Orchestra conducted by John Mauceri
“Danny Elfman: Serenada Schizophrana”



WDAV 89.9 • Box 8990 • 423 N. Main Street • Davidson, N.C. 28035-8990 • (877) 333-8990 • Fax: (704) 894-2997


©2014 WDAV. All rights reserved.